The Beeb reaches South Asia in 'Nik' of time

By , agencyfaqs!, New Delhi | In Media Publishing | June 27, 2007
In a step recognising the emergence of South Asia and its economy, BBC World has launched the popular 'World News Today - with Nik Gowing' targeting the South Asian market

For & #BANNER1 & # decades, now, BBC World has been bringing the world to South Asia - but now it will also do it the other way round. In a step that recognises the emergence of South Asia and its economy, BBC World has launched the popular 'World News Today - with Nik Gowing', a dedicated South Asia show.

Nik Gowing will present the hour-long programme, going live on weekdays from July 23 at 9.30 pm. "The show will be compulsory viewing for anyone who wants to keep a tab on South Asian news and should supplement the local news feed that Indians get through dozen umpteen news channels. As we speak, the entire world is moving, and so is South Asia and India," says Nik Gowing, who was in Delhi to launch the show.

But isn't BBC late in its focus on the South Asian market, which comprises some of the fastest-growing economies in the world? "We always have had an eye on South Asia, and featured all the significant happenings here through our World News Today, Asia show. Now, with a dedicated South Asia show, we'll make sure of more comprehensive coverage. And, we are not late. In fact, this is the most happening time in South Asia, both politically and economically," he adds.

Nik Gowing
When Nik was quizzed about issues in South Asia that needed to be addressed, he was up to the mark. "Climate change is one issue which I feel is relevant, not just in South Asia but all throughout the world. Coastal India has witnessing floods for past few years. Is it change in climate or just a weather progression? Then, energy is another issue that would keep popping up from time to time. Also, I believe nuclear ambitions and technology boom are two other issues inseparable from South Asia," adds Nik, the winner of BAFTA in 1981 for his exclusive coverage of the imposition of martial law in Poland and silverware winner at the New York Television Festival for his nightly coverage of the 1991 Gulf War.

Gowing did not agree that India wasn't being featured regularly in global news and also denied that India is always shown in a negative light by international news channels. "It would be foolish to ignore India, especially after 1990s, when it picked its growth pace. For me India is not just about poverty, inequality, child marriage, but it is also about mobile boom, retail growth and double-digit GDP," he explains.

At the time of the death of Princess Diana in 1997, Gowing anchored coverage for over seven hours. He also did extensive coverage in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks and won the 2002 Hotbird Award. "I have been associated with some of the biggest mishappenings. Hope I am not coming here to present something uncalled for," concludes Nik in his trademark witty style.

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