AMO Communications wins Think Negative contest

By , agencyfaqs!, Mumbai | In Advertising | February 05, 2008
The contest, which is organised by Dainik Bhaskar, is based on the theme of HIV/AIDS awareness

AMO Communications & #BANNER1 & # has won the Think Negative contest organised by Dainik Bhaskar Corporation. The contest, which is in its second year, is based on the theme of HIV/AIDS awareness, and invites entries from agencies across the country in an effort to promote the fight against the virus.

More than 400 entries were received and then judged by members of the media and advertising fraternities, including Sanjay Khare (creative director, Euro RSCG), Adrian Mendoza (executive creative director, Dentsu Communications) and Jignesh Maniar (creative director, O&M).

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Creative director Robert D'Silva, art director and photographer Minoti Shetye and copywriter Gwendoline Fernandes of AMO Communications Mumbai took away the top prize for their campaign, 'The Story of AIDS'. It involved a slice-of-life shot of three low grade film posters stuck in succession on a dingy wall. The first poster is of a titillating movie, Reshma ki Jawani, followed by Ek Hi Bhool (Just One Mistake) and, lastly, Bhayaanak Maut (A Ghastly Death). The three obviously indicate how unprotected sex is a sure-shot way to get HIV. A line in Hindi towards the end of the ad speaks of protecting against HIV by using a condom.

Sanjeev Kotnala, associate vice-president and national head, communication, Dainik Bhaskar Corp., says, "HIV/AIDS is today a very important social issue and the only way to control the spread of and the stigma associated with HIV/AIDS is through awareness. We hope this contest and campaign will help in fighting this syndrome."

The contest invited advertising agencies across India to participate in getting the best possible creative expression for this social cause, to not only create awareness, but to also effect real change through action.

For the record, World AIDS Day (December 1) was started in 1988 with the intention of increasing awareness, education and fighting prejudice. Around 95 per cent of HIV infected people live in developing nations such as India, and perhaps the most effective way of battling the virus is through public awareness and education.