Marie Clarie India says, 'Think Smart, Look Amazing'

By Sumantha Rathore , afaqs!, New Delhi | In Media Publishing | April 07, 2010
The fashion magazine has changed its tagline, and gone back to the core value of highlighting intelligent stories, fashion and beauty

The Indian edition of the fashion magazine Marie Claire has changed its tagline, from 'Let Me Be Me' to 'Think Smart, Look Amazing'. The change is in effect from the April issue of the magazine. Launched in 2006, Marie Claire India used the tagline 'Let Me Be Me' only in this country, to substantiate its launch campaign against moral policing.

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Suresh Selvaraj, president, Marie Claire, says, "The old tagline has served its purpose and we need to go back to the core value of Marie Claire, which is to highlight intelligent features, captivating fashion and alluring looks. Our magazine's journalistic approach on topical issues (both local and international) inspires the reader to think smart. At the same time, our fashion and beauty sections, photography, fashion ideas, beauty tips, amongst other topics, help her to look amazing. We wanted to portray this as the USP of Marie Claire; hence the new tagline."

Across its 35 editions around the world, Marie Claire has two taglines - 'Think Smart, Look Amazing' and 'For Women with Style and Substance'. The Indian edition chose to adopt the former, as it is "more contemporary and crisp", says Selvaraj.

The features section of the Indian edition will now have more stories related to people and society. Also, the section on fashion is being boosted with increased pages, higher-quality presentation and layout, and shopping ideas and fashion lessons, which are being tuned to suit the modern Indian women. Fashion and beauty will continue to comprise 50-55 per cent of the magazine.

The magazine also intends to have interface with readers across the metros on a regular basis, through styling and grooming sessions, coupled with group discussions on contemporary issues related to Indian women.

The Indian edition of the magazine recently roped in Neena Haridas as its editor. She has over 15 years of experience in media.

The magazine has a print run of 65,000 copies and is hopeful of increasing this; with the marketing push being given to the brand. In order to make sure that the issues are visible in the market, Display Contest has been organized with the trade fraternity, running across six cities and 700 outlets.

Under this contest, all the newsstands have to ensure that at least one copy of Marie Claire is completely, and not partially, visible at the stands. The store that ensures that the copy of Marie Claire is visible continuously for six months will win cash prize and gifts.

Outlook, the publisher of Marie Claire in India, is spending Rs 15 lakh on ensuring that this exercise is executed appropriately.

Talking about how the content of the Indian edition has changed since its launch, Selvaraj says, "Marie Claire has been around from 1937 - ever since it got launched in the fashion capital of the world, Paris. All throughout, the very DNA of Marie Claire remains the same - that is, to combine strong features with captivating fashion and alluring beauty."