Cannes 2010: Publicis bags gold in Design Lions for internal work

By Prajjal Saha , afaqs!, Cannes | In Advertising | June 24, 2010
Publicis India won a Gold Lion for its internal work; while Ogilvy India bagged a bronze for India Post

After winning two Gold Lions in Press, India bagged one more gold and a bronze in Design Lions. Of the seven shortlisted entries, Publicis India bagged the gold, while Ogilvy India got the bronze.

& #BANNER1 & #For now, the Indian metal tally gives people at the Indian party enough reason to celebrate. Currently, India's wins comprise three Gold, six Silver and seven Bronze Lions.

Publicis bagged a gold for its internal work, where boring data was represented through interesting visuals. With its Beer, Mountain and Sky campaigns, Publicis Communications Mumbai wanted to let planners know about 'The Publicis Planners' Meet', which was held at the agency's headquarters in Paris. Attacking the misconception that planners tend to complicate briefs by going too deep into every brand, posters were designed in a tongue-in-cheek manner, showing the simplest of things in a complicated manner. This also set the agenda for a new, informal way of planning, which was unveiled during the meet.

Elsie Nanji, managing partner, Red Lions, says, "Me being a part of the jury helped. All the three creatives were combined into a campaign, which helped it bag a gold for the campaign."

The jury president, Steff Geissbuhler, partner, Steff Geissbuhler, says, "It was an exceptionally beautiful solution to convert dry data into a visually exciting chart -- interesting way to communicate something which is so dry."

On Ogilvy's India Post campaign, he said it was an original idea, besides being functional, which led it to win a bronze. The objective of the Stamps campaign was to make a calendar that would promote the image of India Post. The calendar captured the many facets of India through gods and goddesses, cinema, sportsmen and celebrities, by commemorating each day of the year through a stamp. Hundred copies of the limited-edition calendar were distributed to top corporate houses, diplomats, ministries and other major stakeholders.

Regarding the judging process in Design this year, he says, "We were looking for innovative ways to express the message." The commercial advertising related entries were, therefore, quickly eliminated.

He adds, "The typography, the combination of ideas and solution, the appropriateness and the functionality -- all had to go together." If something is just beautiful without being functional, it doesn't mean anything, he clarifies.

It's taken some time; but people have now realised that something which is well designed sells more.