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McCann's Kishore Chakraborti brings everyday India closer with new book

By Anushree Bhattacharyya , afaqs!, New Delhi | In Advertising | September 10, 2012
Titled 'Listening Eyes', the book is targeted at students of management, brand managers, media and communication experts. It provides an insight on how people live in this world and how at every moment, they are trying to cope with various changes.

Amidst all the hustle-bustle in the Capital, Kishore Chakraborti, vice-president, consumer insight and human futures development, McCann Erickson launched his book, 'Listening Eyes'. The book, which is targeted at students of management, brand managers, media and communication experts, provides an insight on how people live and struggle to cope with various changes.

Kishore Chakraborti

Speaking about the book, Chakraborti says, "The book is about the way we live in this world and how we often fail to notice how swiftly things are changing around us. At the same time, we are riding or trying to fight or struggling to cope with the change. Advertising looks very colourful when one takes a look at from the perspective of life. However, when seen as a business, it is a serious job where one needs to sell products or services to consumers and for that, one needs to have a clear understanding of the customer."

For the book, the author draws inspiration from his own life, especially his mother. He says that being an ordinary housewife, his mother played different roles in a joint family and in between her daily chores, managed to hum songs, recite poems, tell stories and talk about his exciting future. From his mother, he learnt the art of dreaming and of being a selfless man.

The author next talks about his maternal grandfather, who took him to the local mela (fair), and how these trips provided a first-hand understanding of the Indian consumers and their behaviour. The trips also provided an insight into the consumption pattern of consumers.

The author then talks about his encounter with English movies and how he was expected to learn something new every time he was taken to a cinema theatre. At home, he was introduced to the terrifying media called 'English' newspaper. He had to read out the paper every morning to his father and armed with a dictionary, stumbled over the steep editorial columns of The Statesman. He next listened to the radio in the evening, which aired serious programmes such as debates and discussions and, after trying to adjust to all these changes, he was introduced to the 'idiot box', the television set. He emphasised on how television has gone through a massive transformation from the old days of Mahabharat to Master Chef.

The book talks about all the changes and transformations an Indian consumer has gone through and has evolved into a new age consumer.

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