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Discovery Kids & WWF-India propagate Wild Wisdom

To increase awareness about the importance of soil for a stable environment, a wildlife quiz competition was launched in more than 10, 000 schools.

Discovery Kids and World Wildlife Fund-India brought out the new edition of the national-level wildlife quiz called Wild Wisdom Quiz. The theme for this year's quiz is 'Soil', based on UN's declaration of the year 2015 as the 'International Year of Soils'.

According to the official statement, Discovery Kids & WWF-India's Wild Wisdom Quiz 2015 received participation from more than 25,000 students across India. The quiz, which is being supported by the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, this year, has been held in 15 cities across India. It has reached out to more than 10,000 schools and invited participation from children at various levels - Middle School level (Classes 6-8); Junior School quiz (Classes 3-5) and an online version for High School students (Classes 9-12). The quiz culminated at the city level for the Junior School children, whereas the Middle School winning teams from 15 cities will compete at the national level, to be held at the WWF auditorium, New Delhi, today.

Discovery Kids & WWF-India propagate Wild Wisdom
Discovery Kids & WWF-India propagate Wild Wisdom
Commenting on the association, Rahul Johri, EVP & GM - South Asia, Discovery Networks Asia-Pacific, says, "Children are the change agents. Discovery Kids and WWF-India's Wild Wisdom Quiz aims to engage children to sensitise them towards the protection of our environment and wildlife for a better tomorrow."

Radhika Suri, director of Environment Education at WWF-India, says that the organisation is elated to see the level of participation this year.

The release further states, "Wild Wisdom Quiz 2015 aims to provide students a unique opportunity to delve deeper into the natural history, wildlife and resources of this country. It strives to build their interest towards the rich natural legacy and inspire them to work towards its conservation."