Aishwarya Ramesh
Design Digest

Dabur's Real Activ fruit, veggie juice cartons now say 'gut health', 'heart health', 'immunity boost'

The new packaging claims that the juices have multiple benefits, such as immunity boosting, being good for gut health and helping promote heart health.

In 2020, phrases like ‘immunity boosting’ became quite buzzy in the world of marketing. Companies like Coca-Cola introduced immunity boosting variants of Minute Maid (with Vitamin C in it). Amul introduced a haldi-flavoured ice cream, and Saffola introduced a kadha pre-mix – all in pursuit of the elusive immunity and good health.

Dabur took the opportunity to revamp one of the products in its juices portfolio. Real Activ has a range of juices made with a combination of fruits and vegetables. These juices, in particular, have revamped their packaging to reflect the benefits that they (the juices) offer.

Dabur's Real Activ fruit, veggie juice cartons now say 'gut health', 'heart health', 'immunity boost'

The juices are available in these variants – Apple, Beetroot + Carrot, Cucumber + Spinach, Orange + Carrot, and Fibre + multi-fruit. The packaging is predominantly white in colour, with photographs of the fruit and vegetable ingredients on the boxes.

Dabur's Real Activ fruit, veggie juice cartons now say 'gut health', 'heart health', 'immunity boost'

The Tetra pak prominently advertises the product benefits. The Beetroot + Carrot juice claims to improve gut health, the Cucumber + Spinach juice claims to boost immunity, and the Orange + Carrot juice claims to improve heart health.

Dabur's Real Activ fruit, veggie juice cartons now say 'gut health', 'heart health', 'immunity boost'

In a pre-pandemic world, it would have seemed odd to have these product benefits jump out at the consumer in the packaging, but in a post-COVID world, these claims seem quite commonplace.

Roshnee Desai, founder and creative director at design agency LOCAL, likes the packaging, but points out that the grid format is a little severe.

“It reminds me of timetables and schedules. Grids are a tool normally used for layout design. It makes sense to use it to print a calorie chart, but it doesn’t seem a natural fit in this case.”

Roshnee Desai
Roshnee Desai

She adds that she likes the images of the fruits, and how they have been photographed and placed on the cover. She mentions that the logo, however, doesn’t seem to integrate with the rest of the packaging.

“The copywriting of the product benefits are really good. It clearly communicates the function of the juices. This is the first time the function is the main focus of the design and that’s a refreshing take on packaging. The copy is fantastic, but the way it’s designed and put together doesn’t work that well for me.”

Shekhar Badve, founder-director of branding and design agency Lokus Design, calls the products’ packaging good because the claim is very straightforward and easily visible.

“However, it seems to me that the company might be extrapolating the claim. What is the percentage of fibre content? How does this boost immunity? If I saw this product in a supermarket shelf, my first reaction might be one of doubt. The consumers these days are more aware. People actually read the label and look for product benefits.”

Shekhar Badve
Shekhar Badve

He adds that the claim of being ‘immunity boosting’ might be a bit of a blind spot right now, considering that multiple products are claiming to have the same benefit.

“I’d rather concentrate on eating actual food that boosts my immunity. From a brand point of view, it appears to be a topical way to build over emotions and get sales,” Badve concludes.