Aakriti Shrivastava
Digital

"Our new digital film for Kinley builds on the story we began to tell last year": Debabrata Mukherjee, Coca-Cola India

After the success of its 'Being Honest' TVC, the brand has taken the idea of truth and honesty forward with a new digital ad.

Coca-Cola's bottled water brand, Kinley, has launched a digital campaign titled 'Give truth a chance'. The digital film, featuring and aimed at young adults, has been created by Ogilvy & Mather. It carries the tagline 'Boond Boond Mein Sacchai', which has been used previously by the brand. The campaign will be promoted on social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and the spot will also be heard on radio.

The new ad carries forward the idea from the previous Kinley ad, 'Being Honest', which was rolled out late last year. With a unique approach towards trust and relationships, the ad had grabbed attention and become a topic of discussion on social media. While the previous ad presented a single scenario where truth deepens a father-daughter relationship, the recent one has extended it to multiple situations in everyday lives, where people correct their wrongs by speaking the truth.

"Our new digital film for Kinley builds on the story we began to tell last year": Debabrata Mukherjee, Coca-Cola India
"Our new digital film for Kinley builds on the story we began to tell last year": Debabrata Mukherjee, Coca-Cola India
Debabrata Mukherjee, VP, marketing, Coca-Cola India & South West Asia, says, "Water, as a category, stands on the key pillar of 'trust'. When we looked inside society, we observed that people did have a tendency to lie in order to avoid an unpleasant situation in everyday life. This gave us a great meeting point for our intent and the consumers' lives, and led to the communication idea of 'Boond Boond Mein Sacchai'."

"Our new digital film aims to build on the message Kinley established last year and continues to tell the story that moments in our daily lives become better if you give truth a real chance. We are confident that audiences will be able to identify with it, as the story mirrors the various relationships and occasions around us," he adds.

The creative agency, O&M, has also worked on the brand's previous commercials. While the idea for the new ad began as a spot for radio, it developed into a digital video after the track was composed. The campaign was led by Ajay Gahlaut, while the creative directors were Divya Bhatia and Vimal Singh.

"Our new digital film for Kinley builds on the story we began to tell last year": Debabrata Mukherjee, Coca-Cola India
Amarinder Butalia, senior VP, Ogilvy & Mather, says, "Water always brings relief and so does the truth. Both have no substitute. Kinley stands for pure, honest drinking water and nothing else. The fit is rather perfect." Talking about the minimal brand presence in the video, she says, "We wanted the brand to be a natural fit in the life of our consumer. Hence, we have shown real consumption occasions that seamlessly fit in with the storyline."

The ad is two minutes and 44 seconds long, and does not have any dialogues, but is accompanied by a catchy jingle, penned by Swanand Kirkire, about peace and satisfaction in truthfulness. Singer Papon has voiced the jingle and the video is produced by Little Lamb Films.

Does it hold water?

"Our new digital film for Kinley builds on the story we began to tell last year": Debabrata Mukherjee, Coca-Cola India
"Our new digital film for Kinley builds on the story we began to tell last year": Debabrata Mukherjee, Coca-Cola India
Brand and communication consultant Virat Mehta feels that the idea of truth and trust fits well with the bottled water brand. "Water is a category which needs maximum reassurance, as bad water is linked to diseases and problems. I feel that the truth that Kinley has latched onto for a long time fits the category well," he says, adding that the brand has been able to create a proposition that resonates with the consumer, but there is a lot of scope for creativity.

Pallavi Chakravarti, senior creative director, Taproot India, believes the ad makes for feel-good storytelling and that introducing the product only in the end of the ad won't affect recall. "If every character, in every sequence, first took a sip of Kinley and then came out with their confessions, it would've made the product seem like a truth serum," she says. According to her, the song could have been avoided and instead of writing notes, people talking to each other would have had a better impact.