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Twitter acquires publishing platform Revue, enters the newsletter and subscriptions space

The social media platform wants to help writers grow their readership and has lowered paid newsletter fee to 5 per cent from the existing 6 per cent.

Twitter, an American microblogging social network has acquired Dutch publishing platform Revue. Founded in 2015, the platform “makes it easy for writers and publishers to send editorial newsletters — and get paid.”

The acquisition marks Twitter’s entry into the newsletter and subscription business. “With a robust community of writers and readers, Twitter is uniquely positioned to help organizations and writers grow their readership faster and at a much larger scale than anywhere else,” said Twitter's product lead Kayvon Beykpour and VP of publisher products Mike Park in an official post published on 26 January 2021.

Twitter acquires publishing platform Revue, enters the newsletter and subscriptions space

The duo went on to write, "Our goal is to make it easy for them to connect with their subscribers... We’re imagining a lot of ways to do this, from allowing people to sign up for newsletters from their favorite follows on Twitter, to new settings for writers to host conversations with their subscribers. It will all work seamlessly within Twitter.

The microblogging social media network also plans to help those looking to generate revenue.

Twitter is creating a durable incentive model through paid newsletters and starting 26 January 2021 it is making Revue’s Pro features free for all accounts and lowering the paid newsletter fee to 5 per cent from the existing 6 per cent, a competitive rate that lets writers keep more of the revenue generated from subscriptions.

In June 2020, Twitter had introduced voice tweets that captured up to 140 seconds of audio but it applied only to original tweets. And in the same month, it had introduced ‘Fleets’ - a new way for users to have conversations that disappear after 24 hours (similar to Instagram's stories).